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The Fairfax County Federation of Citizens' Associations

requests the pleasure of your company at the

Seventieth Annual Awards Banquet

honoring

2019 Fairfax County Citizen of the Year

Lisa Sales
Lisa Sales

Citation of Merit Honorees

Dorothy Keenan
Dorothy Keenan

Holly Seibold
Holly Seibold

Lifetime Achievement/Special Gratitude Award Honoree


Sharon Bulova

Sharon Bulova

Special Gratitude Award Honorees


John Cook
John Cook

Cathy Hudgins
Cathy Hudgins

Linda Smyth
Linda Smyth

Friday, the First of May, 2020

at the

Springfield Golf & Country Club

8301 Old Keene Mill Road, Springfield, Virginia

Cocktails 5:30 p.m.

Program 6:30 p.m.

Cost $55 plus processing fee, payable in advance, upon arrival please provide your QR confirmation code or confirmation number for entry

Please click here to register for the Banquet
Please RSVP by Monday, April 27, 2020.

Lisa Sales

Lisa Sales
the 2019 Fairfax County Citizen of the Year

Lisa Sales has been a tireless advocate in our community focusing on advancing civil rights, fighting against violence, and prohibiting discrimination. Her community activities recently have led to several key accomplishments.

Lisa Sales worked closely with county officials and other community volunteers to identify a property along Richmond Highway that could be used to establish a new domestic violence shelter in the southern part of Fairfax County, resulting the opening of Artemis House Region 1 in March 2019, a domestic violence shelter serving men, women, children, and people identifying as transgender. She created trusted relationships with community members, elected and appointed officials, as well as with leaders in the human service agencies and nonprofit organizations to accomplish this goal. Prior to the opening of Artemis House Region 1, there were only two shelters in the county that supported victims of domestic violence, leaving residents in the southern part of the county without a safe place to go that could be reached in a short amount of time.

Lisa was a critical player to ensure Virginia’s Ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), which proscribes sex discrimination directly in the Constitution itself, rather than only piecemeal through federal or state laws, and confirms Congress’ power to legislate. Lisa built coalitions and brought diverse stakeholders together to find common ground. She spoke at numerous events and provided important testimony which advocated for the eventual ratification of the ERA. Serving on the leadership team of VARatifyERA, she helped develop strategies and communications plans to accomplish their mission.

Lisa serves on the Fairfax County Commission for Women, which advises the County Board of Supervisors on policies and initiatives to promote gender equality, eliminate violence against women, and honor women and girls in Fairfax County. She has played a key role in building the reputation of the commission, making it a sought-after subject matter expert and trusted partner/adviser. She has helped coordinate policy agendas, garnering consensus for future implementation. In her role with the Commission, she has identified gaps in current laws and regulations that leave women vulnerable and been instrumental in persuading lawmakers to make policy changes.

For her many and diverse volunteer efforts as a tireless advocate in our community focusing on advancing civil rights, fighting against violence, and prohibiting discrimination, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Lisa Sales as Citizen of the Year.

Dorothy Keenan

Citation of Merit Recipient Dorothy Keenan

Dorothy Keenan has worked with older adults for over 45 years and has spent her career planning and providing classes, programs and workshops to older adults. She retired in January of 2008 from Fairfax County’s Community and Recreation Services as the Supervisor of Senior Services, overseeing the operations of 13 senior centers. Currently, Dorothy is the founder and Executive Director of GrandInvolve, a program that is making a difference in the lives of our Fairfax County children. GrandInvolve seeks to increase the number of older adult volunteers who volunteer in a classroom at Fairfax County’s Title 1 Schools. The objective is to improve both the quality of life for older adult volunteers and the educational outcomes of our school age children. In the summer of 2013, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors held a series of focus groups in which over 800 senior citizens were encouraged to share their concerns and voice their desires with county leaders to make the County a “livable community for all ages”. This research led to the development to what is now known as the “50+ Initiatives”. One of the issues targeted was diversity, including intergenerational and intercultural matters. A committee was formed which developed a goal and objectives to achieve. Dorothy Keenan was instrumental in creating GrandInvolve to increase volunteerism at Fairfax County’s Title 1 Schools. A pilot program was implemented in the Fall of 2014 at Crestwood. The first Action Team was formed in June of 2014. The Crestwood Action Team of six people met over the first year to implement a pilot program at Crestwood Elementary in Springfield. Fast forward to 2020 and GrandInvolve has added volunteers to all the Title I schools in the Mount Vernon and Lee Magisterial Districts. The next two years will see the addition of all the schools in the Mason District as well.

The GrandInvolve project leverages the skills and experience of older adults to improve academic outcomes for children in Title 1 Elementary Schools in Fairfax County Virginia. The program is customized for each school by volunteer leaders who enlist and recruit classroom volunteers while working alongside school administration, teachers and community organizations. Classroom volunteers work with students as reading, mentoring, kindergarten readiness and math volunteers. Their presence in the school serves to connect the community with their neighborhood schools, strengthens the bonds of the oldest and youngest community members and supports the education of our most vulnerable populations.

The mission of Grandinvolve is to improve both the quality of life for older adult volunteers and the educational outcomes of school age children within Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS). Intergenerational programs create lasting, meaningful relationships between the generations, and provide multiple benefits. The older, “Grand” volunteers enjoy greater civic connections and may enjoy improved health. The children love to visit with their Grand volunteers and enjoy the one-on-one interaction. This type of personal assistance can increase a child’s comprehension of a subject, often leading to “ah-ha” moments of clarity. Teachers benefit by having an extra hand devoted to helping struggling students. Through intergenerational activities, young and old alike are viewed as assets rather than problems to be solved.

At each school, an Action Team works with school administrators to understand the school’s goals and the issues impeding them. In many Title 1 schools, there is little parent involvement, and families typically do not belong to the PTA or attend evening functions. A GrandInvolve pilot program was established at Crestwood Elementary in the Fall of 2014, with two additional schools added in the 2015/16 school year. We have plans to sustain existing programs and to expand to other FCPS Title 1 schools.

Fairfax County has 47 Title 1 schools, which constitute about 1/3 of all county elementary schools. Each Title 1 school serves very culturally diverse populations. The GrandInvolve project leverages the skills and experience of older adults to improve academic outcomes for children in Title 1 Elementary Schools in Fairfax County Virginia. The program is customized for each school by volunteer leaders who enlist and recruit classroom volunteers while working alongside school administration, teachers and community organizations. Classroom volunteers work with students as reading, mentoring, kindergarten readiness and math volunteers. Their presence in the school serves to connect the community with their neighborhood schools, strengthens the bonds of the oldest and youngest community members and supports the education of our most vulnerable populations.

Dorothy has the vision and the drive that attracts volunteers to join her in her mission. She has been instrumental in keeping the organization on track to be at every Title I School in Fairfax County Public Schools in 10 years. GrandInvolve is currently in 20 of the organization on track to be at every Title I School in Fairfax County Public Schools in 10 years. GrandInvolve is currently in 20 of the schools..

For her many and diverse volunteer efforts making a difference in the lives of our Fairfax County children, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Dorothy Keenan with a Citation of Merit.

Holly Seibold

Citation of Merit Recipient Holly Seibold

Holly Seibold is an incredible example of how one citizen can identify a community need and organize to fill it. Her empathy, vision, and ability to build relationships has resulted in an entire organization that serves thousands of women and girls daily in Fairfax County and beyond. She has accomplished all of this in a matter of 4 years and continues to expand the number of people the organization serves, volunteers, as well as advocacy work to change legislation to help women and girls. Holly is an inspiration and a role model to anyone that wonders how can one person ever make a difference in their community. It takes a regular citizen with a big heart, determination, and lots of hard work!

In the last year Holly Seibold has led the citizen movement resulting in legislation impacting 4.3 million Virginians with the passage of key bills that make menstrual supplies affordable and available. Three years ago, Holly Seibold wanted to do something to help women in local homeless shelters. She held a small collection drive at her house, inviting friends and neighbors to donate. They collected over 300 new bras, as well as underwear, pads, and tampons. Holly brought the items to three shelters in the area and soon other shelters were reaching out to her, requesting she hold more donation drives. Holly quickly discovered that the things she collected are some of the most rarely donated because they are expensive for shelters to replenish and not covered by food stamps. Since then, BRAWS has donated thousands of bras, pairs of underwear, and packages of menstrual supplies to over 40 area shelters and approximately 4,000 women and girls in the DC metro area. At any given time, the majority of individuals in a homeless shelter are women and their children. They are typically victims of domestic violence fleeing from abusive homes or are single mothers who have lost their jobs due to unforeseen circumstances and need help getting back on their feet. Regardless of the situation that led these women to homelessness, they need physical and mental support to transition to better lives for themselves and their children. Our mission is to provide them not only with tangible items they need, but to empower them to gain independence and stability.

For her many and diverse volunteer efforts founding an entire organization that serves thousands of women and girls daily, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Tania Hossain with a Citation of Merit.

Sharon Bulova

Lifetime Achievement/Special Gratitude Award Recipient Sharon Bulova

Sharon Bulova was reelected as Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors on November 5, 2015. She was first elected Chairman in a special election on February 3, 2009. Prior to serving as Chairman, she was the Supervisor of the Braddock District from 1988 until 2009.

Sharon believes an informed and engaged community is a well-served constituency. It is important that the community has a place at the table when decisions are being made. Community engagement is essential to striking the right balance between keeping taxes affordable and protecting the quality of life and services we value.

A Northern Virginia resident since 1966, Sharon lives in Fairfax with her husband Lou DeFalaise. Together, they have four adult children and seven grandchildren.

 Priorities

  • Completing Phase II of the Silver Line to Dulles Airport and expanding the availability and efficiency of travel options including bus, sidewalks, trails and bicycle facilities

  • Transforming older commercial/industrial areas into vibrant, mixed-use, transit-friendly communities, offering more life style choices for residents of all ages and abilities

  • Attracting jobs and fostering the growth of exciting new industry sectors (e.g. translational medicine and cancer research at Inova, construction giant Bechtel in Reston, and Cvent, a national leader in event planning, in Tysons)

  • Investing in Fairfax County’s top-tier education system

  • Supporting county services such as parks, libraries and public safety to ensure that Fairfax County continues to be the safest community of our size in the U.S. with an excellent quality of life for our residents

  • Improving policing to ensure best practices for critical incident response, transparency in communications, and release of information (Ad Hoc Police Practices Review Commission)

  • Establishing a process (Diversion First) to improve interaction between individuals suffering from mental illness and the criminal justice system

  • Supporting our 50+ population and helping residents grow older comfortably in Fairfax County

  • Addressing Fairfax County’s affordable and workforce housing needs

  • Meeting the goals laid out in the County’s Ten Year Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness

  • Continuing to navigate the worst economic downturn in this country since the Great Depression with Fairfax County’s triple AAA bond rating intact, while successfully protecting the quality of life we value and rely upon

     Regionalism

    Under Chairman Bulova’s leadership, Fairfax County has been a collaborative leader among neighboring jurisdictions in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Region. Fairfax County residents work and travel throughout the entire region. Promoting open communication and positive relationships among neighboring cities, towns and counties is important to the continued success of Northern Virginia.

  • Chair of the Council of Government’s Greater Washington 2050 Coalition, resulting in the adoption of the Region Forward Regional Compact

  • Member and past chairman of the Northern Virginia Regional Commission (NVRC)

  • Co-founder of the Virginia Railway Express Commuter Rail System 

  • Fairfax County Representative on the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA)

  • Worked closely with many elected leaders to bring Metro to Tysons and Reston 

    One of the highlights of Sharon’s work as Chairman was cutting the ribbon for Metro’s new Silver Line on July 26, 2014. Sharon played an integral role in extending Metro to Tysons and Reston alongside many dedicated colleagues over a period of decades. Chairman Bulova and her colleagues successfully obtained the largest Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan ever issued by the federal government to help fund this transformative regional project. Phase I of the Silver Line is officially open, with Phase II currently underway.

     Leadership & Service

    Founder of Faith Communities in Action (network of faith communities and nonprofits working with Fairfax County Government to respond to the needs of our community)

    Council of Government’s Elizabeth & David Scull Metropolitan Public Service Award, 2009

    Virginia Transit Association's Local Public Official of the Year Award, 2012

    The Center for Non-Profit Advancement’s Phyllis Campbell Newsome Public Policy Leadership Award, 2013 (successfully partnering with the non-profit sector to build more vibrant communities)

    ATFA’s Lifetime Achievement Award, 2014 (extraordinary Leadership in Public Service)

    Workhouse Arts Foundation Founder's Award, 2015

    Member of the VRE Operations Board since its inception in 1989 (worked to advance the VRE from a speculative proposal to a successful reality)

    Member of Fairfax County’s Governing Board to Prevent and End Homelessness   

    Washingtonian Magazine has named Chairman Bulova "One of the Most Powerful Women in the Metropolitan Washington Area”

     Community Projects

    Community engagement is what local government is all about. Sharon enjoys hosting community budget dialogues, spearheading history initiatives, working with the Park Authority to offer summer concerts, and supporting local events. In 2005, Sharon launched an initiative to capture and tell the history of the Braddock District area. “A Look Back at Braddock” resulted in the publication of the book Braddock’s True Gold and braddockheritage.org.  

    Sharon organized a task force that compiled the experiences of Asian Americans who have made Fairfax County their home. This effort resulted in the book The Fairfax County Asian American History Project.

    As Braddock District Supervisor, Sharon founded Braddock Nights, a program of free summer night concerts in Braddock District parks. She now hosts a new summer concert series, Evenings on the Ellipse, at the Fairfax County Government Center. Sharon was also instrumental in starting a Farmers Market at the Fairfax County Government Center featuring local vendors and food trucks.

    For her many and diverse efforts leading Fairfax County, and on the occasion of her retirement from the Board, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Sharon Bulova with a Lifetime Achievement/Special Gratitude Award.

  • John Cook

    Special Gratitude Award Recipient John Cook

    Supervisor John Cook (R-Braddock) was first elected to represent the Braddock district in a 2009 special election. He won his first full term in 2011 and retired from the Board of Supervisors in 2019.

    His various additional positions include chair of the Virginia Railway Express Operations Board, representing the supervisors on the Domestic Violence Prevention Policy Coordinating Council and chair of the joint Infrastructure Finance Committee with the Fairfax County School Board. Cook also serves on the Northern Virginia Transportation Commission and Northern Virginia Regional Commission.

    “I have worked diligently to ensure Braddock residents receive the effective and efficient government they deserve,” Cook said in a statement, “to create an environment that encourages businesses to grow and develop, and to make our communities safer by working to put an end to neighborhood speeding and raising awareness on issues such as violence against women and the need for improved access to mental health treatment.”

    For his many and diverse efforts service Braddock District and Fairfax County, and on the occasion of his retirement from the Board, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize John Cook with a Special Gratitude Award.

    Cathy Hudgins

    Special Gratitude Award Recipient Cathy Hudgins

    Hunter Mill District Supervisor Catherine Hudgins retired in November, bringing her 20-year tenure on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors to a close.

    First elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1999, Hudgins represents the county’s largest magisterial district. She currently chairs the board’s human services and housing committees, and serves as a member of the governing board for Fairfax County’s Initiative to Prevent and End Homelessness.

    A resident of Reston since 1969, Hudgins earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics education from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and she holds a master’s degree in public administration from George Mason University, according to her Fairfax County online biography.

    Prior to entering politics, Hudgins worked as a math teacher and as a computer programmer, instructor, analyst, and consultant for AT&T.

    She has participated in politics since at least 1984 when she was first elected as Virginia national committeewoman on the Democratic National Committee, a position that she held for two terms.

    Her political work before joining the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors also included two years as secretary of the Fairfax County Electoral Board starting in 1993 and a four-year stint as chief of staff for Chairman Katherine Hanley from 1995 to 1999.

    Hudgins’s supporters champion her as an advocate for affordable housing who has shepherded her district, which encompasses the Reston and Vienna areas, through more than a decade of transformation and mixed-use development.

    Hudgins’s work earned her the Public Official of the Year Award from the Virginia Transit Association in 2010 as well as a Distinguished Leadership Award from the Coalition for Mentally Disabled Citizens of Northern Virginia.

    Her commitment to affordable housing has been recognized by the Housing Association of Non-Profit Developers, a regional network of housing providers dedicated to increasing the supply of affordable housing in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.

    “Supervisor Cathy Hudgins has been a tireless advocate for the Hunter Mill District,” Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) said in a tweet. “She’s been a champion for affordable housing and has dedicated her career to making sure every voice is heard in our community. I’m proud to call her a friend and wish her well in retirement.”

    For her many and diverse efforts service Hunter Mill District and Fairfax County, and on the occasion of her retirement from the Board, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Cathy Hudgins with a Special Gratitude Award.

    Linda Smyth

    Special Gratitude Award Recipient Linda Smyth

    After nearly two decades of handling some of Fairfax County’s largest and most nettlesome land-use cases, Supervisor Linda Smyth (D-Providence) is ready to let someone else handle the burden. 

    Smyth announced at the board’s Dec. 4 meeting that she would not seek another term next year.

    “It just seemed like a reasonable time,” she said. “My husband’s ready to retire. We will do all the things we’ve been putting off: traveling, things around the house. People don’t realize how much time a job like this consumes.” 

    A former civic activist and Planning Commission member, Smyth first was elected in 2003 to succeed Gerald Connolly, who successfully ran for chairman.

    Smyth, a Cape Girardeau, Mo., native who holds a doctorate in American history from the University of Virginia, has been immersed for years in the ongoing redevelopments of Tysons and Merrifield and early in her tenure tackled the Fairlee/MetroWest development just south of the Vienna Metro Station, where her district’s new office is located in the Providence Community Center.

    Many condominiums and townhouses have been built as part of the Fairlee/MetroWest project, but the development’s vital commercial space just south of the Metro station still hasn’t been constructed, Smyth said.

    “You can’t make a developer build,” she said.

    Smyth will spend her final year in office tying up a bunch of land-use cases. She noted that supervisors may not act on such matters between next year’s election and January 2020, when the new board takes office.

    In 2017, Providence District accounted for 50 percent of the county’s overall residential-development activity and had a hefty portion of its commercial development as well, Smyth said.

    Maintaining stable residential neighborhoods is critical to the county’s success, Smyth said. Her civic career began when she and her neighbors opposed having their subdivision, Briarwood, turned into high-rise office buildings. 

    “Our neighborhood had to learn land use in a crash course to stop a locomotive that was coming at us,” she said, adding that former Board of Supervisors Chairman Katherine Hanley (D) “was so aggravated with us!”

    Supervisor John Foust (D-Dranesville), who will announce in January his bid for a fourth term, said Smyth is the board’s – and perhaps county’s – leading expert on zoning and the comprehensive plan, especially for rapidly redeveloping Tysons and Merrifield.

    “I would describe her as being not very political, but quite practical in her approach,” Foust said. “I didn’t always agree with her on issues, but always felt she was voting consistent with her conscience and the best interests of the county.”

    Providence District Council vice president Erika Milena Yalowitz and School Board member Dalia Palchik have announced they will seek the Democratic nomination for Smyth’s seat. Smyth, who predicted even more candidates would file to run, said her successor will need to know land use thoroughly.

    Working with the Board of Supervisors is far more pleasant and productive than often is found in local government, Smyth said.

    “I’m on [the Virginia Association of Counties’] board of directors, and we hear stories,” she said. “With as many issues as we have to deal with, the board has been very collegial and civil with each other.”

    For her many and diverse efforts service Providence District and Fairfax County, and on the occasion of her retirement from the Board, the Fairfax Federation is honored to recognize Linda Smyth with a Special Gratitude Award.

    The Fairfax County Federation of Citizens Associations, established in 1940, is the countywide voice for homeowner, civic, and community associations. An all-volunteer organization, The Federation works on issues that impact Fairfax County residents, including education, transportation, the environment, human services, land use, the county budget, and state and federal legislative issues.

    PRESS CONTACT: Matthew Dunne, COY Chair, FedCOY2020 @ Fairfaxfederation.org Phone: 703-424-2956

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